8 Tips For Remembering Passwords
8 Tips For Remembering Passwords

Remembering Passwords is a Pain

Managing passwords has become such a pain it’s almost like having a second full-time job.  Once you are finally comfortable with your work computer password, you’re forced to change it.  You submit password change requests so you can log onto Amazon.com and immediately forget the new password.  Worse, the password change email never makes it to your inbox.  How frustrating this can feeling! Password authentication is not going away any time soon, so what are we to do?  Following these 8 tips for remembering passwords should make things a lot easier.

Write Them Down (but use a code)

Keeping a password list is, by far, the easier way to remember your passwords.  Unfortunately, it’s also one of the least secure.  Lists are often left laying around, where people might get eyes on them.  If you want to use a list, consider writing your passwords in code.  For example, you might type the first three letters as a reminder follow by asterisks or write down hints pertaining to the password.  Write them in a way that only you will understand them and that you will not forget.

Create Memorable Phrases or Sentences

Passwords that use memorable phrases or sentences as their base are often easy to remember and are also easy to change without forgetting. For instance, a fan of Abraham Lincoln might use words from his famous Gettysburg Address.  Using the first line, they could create the following passwords: 4score&7, FourScore&7, 4Score&Seven, etc.  These are very easy to remember and offer variety when changing passwords.  It is recommended that you attach a suffix to the end of these passwords to make them more complex.

Use a Base Word

One easy tip for remembering passwords, especially when you have many to remember, is to use a base word.  A base word is a string of characters that you use in creating all your passwords.  You complete the password by attaching extra characters to it, based on what the account is for.  Let’s take, for example, an Amazon Prime account.

Imagine my base word was B@s3b@ll.  A good password for my Amazon Prime account might be B@s3B@ll_AP.  The password includes the base word, an underscore and a suffix of ‘AP’, for Amazon Prime.  In this case, only the last two characters need to change from account to account.

Keep it seasonal

Another great tip for remembering passwords is to keep them seasonal.  Often, every couple months you are force to change your password.  This is especially common at work.  Try using seasonal phrases and words in your passwords.  They are easy to recall because they are based in your current reality.  So, using Blu3Xmas! in December would be very easy to remember.  Another great way to make and remember passwords is to base them on the seasons themselves; H0tSumm3r2018!, for example.  This way, when the seasons change, so do your passwords.

Use Lyrics

Using song lyrics is another great way of remembering your passwords.  Something like, Sh0tSh3rif%, could work if you are a Bob Marley fan.  There are so many song lyrics that you will never run out of options.  Just remember to include numbers and symbols to create complexity.

Let Your Browser Handle It

Most browsers offer to remember your passwords for you.  When logging into an account, you will be asked if you’d like your browser to store those passwords.  Then, any time you log into your browser, regardless of what device you are using, your passwords will be there fore you.  This should only be used on trusted computers and never in public.  That said, allowing your browser to store your passwords is easy and convenient.

Use a Password Manager App

There are many applications that will remember your passwords for you.  Be sure to properly test these apps for your needs before committing to them.  Here is a list of the 10 best password manager apps of 2019.

If you enjoyed this article, please check out some of our others in our Blog.
Want to empower yourself with some advanced technical know-how?  Check out our Knowledge Base.